8 july 2022 shocked to hear of killing of former president abe - do you have a favorite speech or pdf of his? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - i would particularly like to understand his and Japan's support of Un2.0, humanising AI and ideas for 2020s shared at Japan G20- it will take some time to find references most worthy of celebration/ communal action - lets start with his celebration at United Nations 2019 ..........https://www.mofa.go.jp/fp/unp_a/page3e_001107.html....................Address by Prime Minister Abe at the Seventy-Fourth Session of the United Nations General Assembly September 24, 2019 Japanese e-mail Photo: Cabinet Public Relations Office 1. Mr. Chairman, under your chairmanship, the United Nations will commemorate the 75th anniversary of its founding. On this occasion, I ask you to recall that my country, Japan, upholding the principles of the United Nations, has walked a path that has been steadfast, always intending to realize the goals of the United Nations. For the UN, which has now come three quarters of a century since its founding, structural reform, especially that of the Security Council, is absolutely imperative. We aim for the early realization of such reform. In addition, Japan is standing in the 2022 election. By once again receiving the support of numerous countries, we wish to serve as a non-permanent member of the Security Council and make our best efforts towards the further realization of the principles of the UN. I ask for your ardent support in this. In Japan, a new Emperor has acceded to the imperial throne and the ceremony for His Majesty to declare this fact to both domestic and international audiences is near at hand, on October 22. Heads of state and government and top leaders from approximately 200 nations and international organizations will attend, and there is no greater joy than that of the well-wishing extended to us upon the start of the Emperor’s new era. The Japanese people regard this as an unparalleled opportunity and they will once again turn their thoughts to the role Japan takes on towards the world. In my country, the period in which a long-standing economic slump caused people to become inward-looking is now a thing of the past. Dates that raise awareness of our strong bonds with the world and turn people’s eyes outward and towards the future -- the Rugby World Cup, of which fierce contests continue to be played out at this very moment; the Olympic and Paralympic Games that will be held next year in Tokyo; and World Expo 2025 that Osaka and the surrounding region will host -- are written large on Japan’s calendar as landmark events. Created this way is a new generation of Japanese, one that is reliable, and willing to carry forth the UN ideals, you may want to say. I would like you also to keep in mind the meeting that will come around to Japan next April. The 14th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, commonly known as “the UN Crime Congress” will convene in Kyoto. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime holds the meeting once every five years. Fifty years will have passed since 1970, when Japan hosted this same meeting as the first UN Crime Congress held outside Europe. At its prime for cherry blossoms, Kyoto, I know, will be welcoming visiting experts in law enforcement. 2. What I have just said leads one to see what value Japan seeks in its engagement with the world, in that it values education, for the country's primary objective is to foster the power of individuals, one by one. To continue to do so has been and still is the very essence of what Japan can contribute to the rest of the world. As for the law enforcement experts who will gather in Kyoto next spring, Japan has done nothing one off, like bringing them to a meeting just once. Rather, it has long sought its own role in continuing to foster them. As early as in 1962, with the deepening of knowledge about crime prevention its primary objective, Japan established in Tokyo the United Nations’ first specialized institute in that field. Named the United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, this institute was launched with the late Norval Morris, a renowned criminologist, as its inaugural director. By the end of September this year it will have produced a large number of “alumni.” The total amounts to more than 5900, including, for instance, 2949 from Asia and 678 from Africa. 3. Now, it was this past March that Malala Yousafzai was in Tokyo. She looked me right in the eye and said, “As many as 100 million girls lack the skills they need to have a good command of modern technology, for they don't undergo a minimum education of 12 years.” She says that if all girls completed secondary school, they could add up to 30 trillion US dollars to the global economy. I invited Malala to Japan before the G20 Osaka Summit I would chair in June, hoping to highlight policies that empower women and girls. If women were able to demonstrate the potential they hold, the world would sparkle that much more. But that is an obvious truth, isn't it? In Japan, where the labour participation rate for women has seen a marked rise, we are witnessing that self-evident fact on a daily basis. I am delighted that we were able to capture what Malala advocates for in both the G20 Leaders’ Declaration and another outcome document in the annex. We pledged to “promote inclusive quality education for all girls and women.” Japan wishes to run at all times at the very front of the pack with respect to these efforts. 4. Now, let me tell you of an example from Tanzania. When I was turning 30 years of age, I remember a Tanzanian marathon runner, Juma Ikangaa, was fiercely competitive every time he ran the Tokyo Marathon. After returning home in Tanzania, Mr. Ikangaa, who considers Japan to be his second home, became a goodwill public relations ambassador at the local office of JICA, the Government of Japan’s agency for international cooperation. Sent from Japan to be stationed there, was a woman full of energy, named Miwa Ito. The two of them combined forces, with Ms. Ito getting sponsorship funding from 13 Japanese companies and Mr. Ikangaa searching for girls who could be future Olympians. Their efforts ultimately culminated in Tanzania’s first-ever women’s track meet. That was in November 2017. One thousand girls living nearby attending elementary and junior high schools were invited as spectators. But they were not there simply to watch the event. Educational materials on avoiding teenage pregnancy were also handed out. Having the girls read these materials was another purpose. In Arusha, Tanzania, an area the Masai and others call home, where the high peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro can be seen in the east-northeast, an all-girls’ junior high school named “Sakura” opened in January 2016 through the efforts of a group of Japanese people. The school is entirely residential in order to provide its students with absolute security and safety. The number of students has grown from 24 at the beginning to 162 this past spring. The Japanese government supports the school financially, but it is run by NGOs, both Japanese and local. They teach the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and mathematics -- and how to avoid unwanted pregnancies. In Cambodia as well, I know there is a Japanese entrepreneur who has been working to improve education there, a project that is entirely his own brainchild. His initiative sends Japanese teachers, seasoned veterans in math and science, to Cambodia. There, they coach young men and women who are on track to become teachers. The initiative is called “Teachers Without Borders.” I find it very much heart-warming to see people in Japan’s private sector devoting themselves voluntarily in this way to the education of young people, especially girls, in Tanzania and in Cambodia, purely out of intrinsic motivation, without seeking anyone’s recognition as such. 5. Over the next three years, the Government of Japan will provide enriched education to a minimum of nine million children and young people in Sub-Saharan African and Asian nations. We plan to expand “e-learning” for primary school children in Sri Lanka as well as Internet-based mathematics and science education in Rwanda. But I must say that these endeavours were largely inspired by the efforts underway by people in the private sector. Mr. Chairman, this is my seventh consecutive year to deliver a statement in the general debate at the General Assembly. Over this time, I have consistently emphasized the importance of empowering women and girls and the value of making health care universally available. This year too, I have addressed both of these issues at separate meetings on the side-lines. At the same time, I wish to emphasize that the essence of Japan’s international engagement can be found in the fact that we earnestly value education, as seen in the contributions of Japan that I just mentioned. Japan aspires to be an “FP,” shall I say, or a “foster power," one that fosters human capacity. 6. As I reach the end of my statement, I will raise three points briefly. Point number one is regarding North Korea. Japan supports the approach taken by President Trump. The approach by which the two leaders talk candidly with each other and try to work out the issues at hand while seeing a bright future ahead has changed the dynamics surrounding North Korea. I am determined to meet Chairman Kim Jong-un myself face to face, without attaching any conditions. Japan’s unchanging objective is to normalize its relations with North Korea through comprehensively resolving the outstanding issues of concern with North Korea, including the abductions, nuclear, and missile issues, as well as settling the unfortunate past. Point number two is that Japan shares the concerns regarding the Middle East situation. The attack on Saudi Arabia’s crude oil facilities was an extremely contemptible crime that holds the international economic order hostage. I consider precious the pronouncement made to me directly by Supreme Leader Khamenei of Iran, that he issued as a fatwa three repudiations regarding nuclear weapons, namely “not to possess, produce, or use” them, and has ensured thorough implementation of that fatwa. This morning too I held a summit meeting with President Rouhani, our ninth in total. It is my own unchanging role to call on Iran as a major power to take actions that are grounded in the wisdom derived from its rich history. Point number three, and my final point, is that Japan will make use of multilateral frameworks and globalism, to reduce disparities, inter alia. On the heels of the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement) and the Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement, the RCEP (Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership) is now poised to reach agreement, with Japan's contribution serving as a propelling force. The world will become more connected, leading more people to escape from poverty. In recent years I chaired the G7 and G20 summits as well as the Tokyo International Conference on African Development, or “TICAD,” three times, demonstrating repeatedly that multilateral frameworks do indeed have that role as a leveller. As a consequence, the terms “quality infrastructure” and “a free and open Indo-Pacific” have entered the lexicon of the international community, I would like you to note. 7. TICAD Seven held earlier this year was reborn as “New TICAD.” This is because the words to talk about Africa from now should by all means tell a story of investment and growth. In fact, the Business Forum held at the same time as the TICAD conference was jam-packed with businessmen and women from Africa and Japan and electric with eager enthusiasm. I also came out of the forum with a sense that new investment proposals and new projects are materializing quickly. Changes in Africa encourage us. The world does indeed change. We are able to change it through the efforts we make. And that confidence shall be reaffirmed right here in this great assembly hall. With that, I will end my statement. Thank you very much. Related Links Prime Minister Abe Visits the United States of America and Belgium (September 23-28, 2019) United Nations General Assembly Japan and the United Nations
welcome to economistjapan.com, Japanthanks.com and economistwomen.com - first 60 years
See all 276 articlesEaster Day 2021 - in the last 2 weeks Japan kickstarted the most exciting solutions debate on celebrating our human race's sustainability since the start of the 21st century or JFK's search in 1962
-thank you chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington dc and glasgow

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urgent help needed for friends of japan and all young lives matter survey: how can japan society most help japan and japan's inspiration of asian sdg youth = two thirds of world youth? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

for worldwide views on 2020s as most exciting decade -defining our species future - please go to The Economist's Norman Macrae (Japan Order Rising Sun Gold Bars) Curriculum www.entrepreneurialrevolution.city
zoomuni.net -breaking 2020 -zooming beyond reality- some nations 30 years behind our 1984 timelines for ai teaching/ studying - download and ask for our maps of who's leading
chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk may 2020 (bicycling distance from national institute of health bethesda md usa) writes:
since 1960 most of the world's population mapping sdg development - eg asians as over 60% of humans have traded round a japanese translation of global system- compounding solutions americans like deming and borlaug open sourced -more than any other single system dynamic friends have been able to map- brookings update 2020- 5/15 how taipei, seoul, hk, saved their peoples, and hanoi

back to middle of 20th c-perhaps it shouldn't be that much of a surprise that it took one of the 2 island nations that most colonised borders up to world war 2 to culturally rollback a higher purpose for uniting peoples
.....

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chris macrae at welcome to SDGIRLS.net and economistsports.net - 2 months ago
*2020s 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G 1970s* *help! with top 20 Economist challenges* *these are the most exciting times to be alive* *E2 Jack Ma and E3 Sir Fazle Abed* *The most exciting game children have never played? World Record Book of Job Creation* *2025 report - last 7 years to global sustainability* *1960s world record jobs creators*......
Back to www.normanmacrae.comSDG education revolutionCommentaryFriends and FamilyFuture HistoryBiographycoming - books.. diary 2020
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EntrepreneurialRevolution.city July 2020..If you care about two out of 3 lives mattering who are Asian, nearly 60 years of miracles mapping around worldwide decision-makers considering Japan from 1962 are worth replaying -that's when my father Norman Macrae aged 39 was privileged to write his first signed survey in The Economist -the first 2 quarters of dad's 80+ years of life had been spent
**writing unsigned leaders in The Economist (eg as only journalist at Messina's birth of EU) after serving as teenager in world war 2 navigating air places uk bomber command region modern day bangladesh/myanmar -
** following his father who worked for british diplomatic services around embassies in midst of conflict - eg mostow of stalin 1934, last adriatic port jews used to escape hitler 1938 )-during this quarter dad concluded that world wars root cause was the history of empires like britain and japan which had trapped most peoples in poverty, to end war he wanted to mediated loving each other's places, ;peoples and especially children

EconomistSports.net EconomistArts.com Musicforsdgs.com

Before we get to the list of miracles look at what has happened to japan in the fisrt year(s) of its new reiwa emperor era- planned was 40 million tourists with olympics ganes as peace-loving centrepiece ; apart from the olympic most tourism celebrated comunity hosts sme busienesses- all being decimated by the virus; japan is uniquely interesting as a nation as unlike other places run by a majority of elders its recruiting youth from other countries to deliver many of its frontline logistics services- this pan asean development plan has also been shattered; since japan loves sports for the right reason - community building not just big corporate noise - gthe ebst outcome would be the olympics beged asians to tale a majoity share of running futire olympics- this would be good for all four of the next hosts if the mayors of tokyo beijing milan and paris chatted about it- and it would be a great opportutity for womens lives matter to exorciose all the sexual predators - and ban ki-moon who is in the middle of 3 world chnaing movement cliate adatoability, curriculum of worldwide youth and teachers civic engagement , ethics dorectirate of teh olympocs could appoint a supersgtar panel of lives matter - eg the wike of kobe (mo0re at www.kobe.mba), manny pacquaio, and since tennis has always been the emeperor family's facoriote sport as well some uk royals, why not let japan and wimbledon select which tennis superstars can bridge retoremengt with linking in youth as the sddg generation.....

Norman Macrae, having survived teenage navigation of RAF planes bomber command world war 2 over modern-day myanmar/bangladesh, joined The Economist in 1949, and retired as the deputy editor of what he called "the world's favourite viewspaper" in 1988. During that time, he wrote extensively on the future of society and the impact of technology. Norman foresaw species sustainability as being determined by post-colonial and virtual mapmaking- 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G if 60s tech could race to moon and Moore alumni promised 100 times more machine intel every decade TO 2025, let's end poverty mediating/educating a world of loving each others' children- so that wherever the next millennials girl is born she enjoys great chance to thrive.

Soon Norman was celebrating his wartime enemy's rising engineers and win-win sme supply chains across far east and very concerned that tod down constitutions english speaking nations led by political bureaucrats wasn't fit for entrepreneurial revolution-he co-opted a young romani prodi to translate Economist 1976 ER survey into multilingual formats

Amongst some of his more outlandish claims: that governments would not only reverse the nationalisation process and denationalise formerly private industries, but would also sell industries and services that had been state operated for so long that it seemed impossible that they could be run by private companies. A pioneer before the pioneers, Macrae imagined privatised and competing telecommunications and utility companies improving service levels and reducing prices.

When others saw arms build-ups as heralding World War III, Macrae predicted the fall of the Berlin Wall by the end of the 1980's.

The Norman Macrae Archive serves as an on-line library, hosting a growing collection of Macrae articles, newspaper columns and highlights from his books. We hope that you find the articles thought provoking and zoom, twitter or question us - norman's son chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk



best wishes

1972 ecconomist survey of 1972-2012- WILL AMERICANS AND EUR-CITIZENS EVER BE FREED ENTREPRENEURIALLY FROM PAPER CURRENCIES THE ONLY ZERO-SUM TRADE MONOPLY IN A WORLD WHERE ACTIONABLE KNOWHOW MULTIPLIES VALUE UNLIKECONSUMING UP THING.....

youth hall of fame - japan global friendship associations 1 2 smart intrapreneurs- sony creative lounge


future of HIStory 1945 -to update 2020s version see also Princeton history project connections with osun and von neumanns future of humansai.com

look first at the G8 biggest jigsaw pieces of nearly 200 nations who sought to unite san francisco 1945-until the virus came 2020 was due to be the happy 75th birthday of nations 17sdgs as well as the frontline heroics of medecins sans frontieres and partners in health- coalitions of soft power had never been so urgent to valuetrue. Nature does not play with walls, and other games of externalization at borders -only mistaken male professionals do as they systemically confuse the power of big getting bigger with advancing the human lot for all our children including wherever the next girl is born

In 1945, there were just over 5% of people who lived in usa and Canada- they had twice saved the old world tri-continent of asia Africa and Europe from world wars. Most remarkably usa that in 1939 ranked 17th in terms of international navies on a par with Portugal had become the heart of the wining allied forces. You had the two northern islands at either end of the coastal belts of west Europe and far eat asia who had multiplied so many colonial poverty traps across the Asian 60+% majority of human race , Africa and middle east’s 10%. In trying to compete with uk, France had arguably been most brutal in colonizing med sea Africa, slave trading needed to develop America north wars up from louisana, as well as napoleons war of nations which had sucked in austria hungary , Germany and Russia among others.by start of 20th c Germany without colonies to feed its engineers need for carbon and steel had become bellicose across all its borders. This left less than 2% people in the iced up and largest land mass of all ussr ready to be the victims of stalin as the second most fearsome tyrant the first hal of 20th century grew exponentially. All the while half of humanity – women – were left out of how the word capitalized land and counted productivity even though a deeper look would show that the led with educators like Montessori and health networkers like Florence nightingale, marie curie and indeed the Franciscan role of the clares as community health missionaries- the conscience of mother mary if you will. 9se girlsworldbank.com) There were of course further geographic oddities- only 10% of people lived in the southern hemisphere; less than 1% of peoples lived on what became a quarter of all nations the SIDS- small island developing nations with minimal land resources but huge ocean estates very much dependent on climate, and nature including good human nature of tourism. And you had the archipelagos especially Indonesia and Philippines with large populations- one the epicentre of the world trade in medicinal spices – know how the dutch prized nutmeg so much that they were prepared to swap with the uk control of one indonesian holland with their us territory new Amsterdam rebranded new york

in 60 years


Tuesday, December 31, 2030

thanks abe, best wishes japan - diary of the north's most dangerous winter in living memory nov 2020-jam 2021

Please click here to start helping would unite celebration of former PM Abe's legacy
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rest of this post was filed as Jpan kept hope going with tokyo olympics so bravely staged summer 2021

update japanthanks.com - can japans society5.0 and gracious olympics beyond covid spitit also promote education valuing social business case studies
example from nhk- 8/24

in the 1950s japans leadership of borlaugs green revolution began to celebrate rural self-sufficiency out if which social-community sustaining business models have evolved -related references kennedy endorses the economist consider japan 1962 - more recently sustainability superstars at japanthanks.com  + 1 (uniting JAB nations)  +2

saraya - win-win japan borneo uganda -abedmooc case catalogue 5.5 sanitation (WASH) community to community

from 1970 saraya became famous in japan- it innovated palm oil cleaners for kitchen use- these are biodegradable unlike petroleum based cleansers

but around 2002 the company was inundated with reports that its sourcing of palm oil from borneo was killing elephants whose palm tree habitat was now being changed as the worlds epicentre of palm oil production; saraya designed a new supply chain including purchase of its own palm tree farms made elephant friendly and so returning its high reputation across japanese society

in 2009, saraya's busneess in uganda started handwashing campaigns to improve the nations sanitation reducing infant mortality by half in under a decade (along with parallel efforts brac uganda)

saraya wanted to make its product massively affordable; to do this it started social business modeling- it recognised that urganda's sugar cane industry could do much better for uganda if it recycled sugar cane waste into ethanol sanitisers; by going into this social business saraya scaled handwash products; as well as reduction of infant deaths, ebola in its neighbor the congo has not come to uganda and so far covid in uganda is less than other neighboring countries- saraya is not claiming that uganda will lead africa in beating covid- bur it is proud that community handwashing sanitation social businesses contribute to minimising diseases, local community businesses empowering women,  childrens education, climate solutions shared from community to community  

=======================previously
60 years ago my father norman macrae in the economist celebrated the rise of his wartime foe- dad was a teen in bomber command over modernday myanmae- by1960 advances on the slide ruler, minature devices and in measuring things were coming from japans microelectronic engineers, bullet trains which could mean either american coast could twin cities at maximum 4 mile railride, advances in mechanical diggers, as well as containerisation vital to just in time sme supply chains, these were solutions that could reverse how mainly british empire had designed trade and infrastructure to extract from the whole of asia- they were as integral to celebrating hopes of the 1960s as telecom satellites and moon races and from 1964 live worldwide sports out of tokyo olympics - livesmatter the way kobe.mba or naosaka.com fans would linkin the world over

none of the g8 with the exception of japan has advanced the sdgoals as worldwide solutions youth needed to celebrate since signing up to them in 2015-so please tell us events we can zoom into with japans common sense 1 nov 2019 to feb 2021
example from the japan society ny - 2 minutes walk from the united nations

The 5G Era: Transforming Business, Industries & Society
Tuesday, November 17, 8—9:30 AM AM EST     Calculate your local time

5G, the next-generation mobile network that promises to move data at greater speeds and connect huge volumes of devices, is already being deployed in urban areas of Japan and the U.S. While giving consumers access to more information faster than ever before, 5G’s biggest impact will be on industry and business, transforming operations. What are the benefits and challenges of 5G technology, and how will it change the way we work and communicate, worldwide? In this program, speakers offer their views on 5G advantages and disadvantages, the potential impact on society, and prospects of U.S.-Japan collaboration. Followed by a Q&A.

Speakers:
Elsa B. Kania, Adjunct Senior Fellow, Technology and National Security Program, Center for a New American Security
Yuka Koshino, Research Fellow for Japanese Security and Defence Policy, International Institute for Strategic Studies
Muriel Médard, Cecil H. Green Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Kazuo Noguchi, Senior Manager, Cyber Security Team, Research & Development Division, Hitachi America, Ltd.

Admission:
This is a free event. You must register for the webinar to receive the login details.


Register →

chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
why do we think the most dangerous norther winter is looming? well here are 3 lessons from trump oct 2020 which transpired out of the town i live n bethesda md -and here our issues our outofbeltway friends love to zoom with anyone wishing to share live saving knowhow

the story of the human race so far- 2 out of three people are asian-norther empires mainly britain trapped most continental asians in poverty ysing first comers advantages of machine age that emerged from glasgow u 1760s watt and smith

japans first 45 years of 20th c also did terrible harm to neighboring asians but from 1945 it shared every solution it found including borlaugs end starvation od a billion people with better local rice productivity, immunization sxience, better engineering from deming

japan stimulated the race to multiply 100 fold more tech analytics every decade gravitated by intel and alumni of silicon chip valley- just when massive local data is beamed up to the clouds in ways that sdg coalitions could share life critical solutions the planet over- other forces are being spun ruining climate, ignoring livesmatter failing to priortise risks like pandemics so clearly understood by gates, google and bush in 2005 

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i hope abe's successor works with him behind the scenes- through the 2010s i always found abe the leader to read first on any global crisis
the world as well as japan so much needed worldwide celebrations of the new Reiwa era to blossom: imagine if the olympics had relaunched a livesmatter contract with all youth aka kobe.mba; coalitions to transparently form around osaka track and society 5.0  - a bridge with world economics forum leadeship of industrial revoltion 4 through 5 regional hubs- sa francisco, tokyo, being, delhi and geneva -all could have streamed rays of light into glasgow cop26

two thirds of the world people are asian- in the last 75 years every asian development has gained from good relations with japanese as the first in the world to become massive practical networkes of
demings engineering knowledge
borlaug's solutions for local food security
various barefoot medic movements led by epidemiologists

normanmacrae.net - my father norman macrae order of the rising sun.  signed library in the economist was limited to one survey a year and then only from his 17th year at the journal- it began with consider japan 1962 and continued to review how to reverse across asia's two thirds of humanity how to reverse the old world colonial mess led by the world's worst ever corporation the east india company, evil capitalism out of london that insisted the far east accept opium as a currency- from 1964 prince charles was europe's first leader to celebrate relations with japan both at royal family levels and in inviting sony to inward invest

if the west had helped japan rebuild trust across those people it hurt up to 1945, adam smiths dream that the best of humans and machines could go west of scotland through usa and asia as an opposite world trade model to the east india company could have restarted at the same tine as the world leapt forward with 100 times moore tech each decade after the moon race decade to these 2020s

those who have spent time reading smith will know that as soon as he saw james watt first engines in the world he spent the rest of his life mediating the united states of english speakers; in his time scotland, ireland, and english royalty if they did not want to go the way of french royalty should all want to be states of a union led out of philadelphia- there was only one condition- the unions constitution should not only repeal slavery but recompense every owner of a business model -eg plantations- which depended on slavery or low cost labor- imagine smithian economics linking in scots irish new england boston new amsterdam/york philadelphia- continuing down us east coastal belt across georgia, to southern belt, alabama and french purchase louisana up the heartland to the great lakes across to west coast usa to hawaii and then to japan and through to asians two thirds of humans at the mid east landbridge through to africa as well as west asia bridge at turkey to south est and central europe- at some stage the northern roof of the old world ie russia could have become much more like canada because of a united asia as well as a united america- united around all lives matter- interestingly the conscious natural movements of the east have far less problems with skin color; and unlike golden rule religions are grounded in community/natural observation

from my sample of 1 being among 7.5 billion.   asians have inspired me to celebrate all lives matter far more than any western movement i have been able to search as a diaspora scottish child growing up in the london of the 1950s
of course i would love to hear what cultures help you translate all lives matte everywhere you connect chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk -scots as a majority diaspora nation are eternally optimistic some would say naive- why not celebrate the best of all peoples skins languages genders homeland duversities not the least common denominator

thank you abe and  i expect i had much more to learn than my any english report of mine can convey

4 comments:

  1. thank you abe, from csis economist goodman - Assessing Abe’s Economic Statecraft

    Read Online
    SIMON SAYS, AUGUST 2020
    By Matthew P. Goodman

    Just days after setting the record for longest consecutive term as Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe announced on August 28 that he was resigning on grounds of poor health. Beyond its durability, Abe’s term may be remembered mainly for its disappointments: his failure to pull the Japanese economy out of its decades-long torpor, to achieve his dream of amending Japan’s constitution, to resolve tensions with neighbors in Northeast Asia. But in one area Abe deserves better marks from historians: his economic statecraft in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

    Abe came back into office in late 2012 determined to avoid the mistakes of his first, aborted term as prime minister in 2006-2007. In that earlier stint, Abe had shown virtually no interest in economics, putting his own constitutional-reform ambitions over the bread-and-butter concerns of most Japanese citizens. Abe 2.0 would not make the same mistake, announcing a three-point economic revitalization plan dubbed “Abenomics” by Japanese commentators.

    Abenomics was well conceived but unevenly implemented. It consisted of “three arrows” aimed at prodding Japanese growth and productivity: aggressive monetary easing, accommodative fiscal policy, and structural reform. Abe did well on the first arrow, appointing a new governor of the Bank of Japan, Haruhiko Kuroda, who made clear he would keep the monetary taps open until deflation was defeated. The fiscal policy record was more mixed, as repeated stimulus packages were undermined by two poorly handled consumption tax hikes. Most disappointing was the third arrow, as many of Abe’s promising structural reform initiatives, from “womenomics” to corporate governance reform, got bogged down by entrenched interests. part 2...continued

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  2. To be fair, Abe’s domestic economic program faced massive headwinds caused by Japan’s daunting “3D” challenges: deflation, debt, and—most intractable of all—demographics. With the country’s aging population set to drop from 128 million at its peak in 2010 to 87 million by 2060, it would take a miracle of enhanced productivity for Japan to generate more than mediocre growth.

    But even with a weak hand at home, Abe understood that Japan’s economic weight as the world’s third-largest economy and a commercial powerhouse in the Asia-Pacific region gave him a trump card in foreign policy. And over his eight years in office, Abe played the economic statecraft card well. He used it to advance two enduring and interrelated goals of Japanese foreign policy: keeping the United States engaged in the Asia-Pacific region and managing the risks of a rising China.

    One of the first things Abe did upon returning to office was to lean into the Obama administration’s “rebalancing” strategy toward Asia. In early 2013, he traveled to Washington and declared in a seminal speech (at CSIS) that “Japan is back.” He made clear his interest in Japan’s joining the U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade negotiations then underway. Despite the stiff resistance he expected from Japanese farmers and other vested interests at home, Abe saw TPP membership as a multifaceted strategic ploy to strengthen the U.S.-Japan alliance, keep the United States embedded in the region, deepen ties with Japan’s Southeast Asian partners, and—not least—send a message to Beijing about Tokyo’s throw weight in regional rulemaking and norm-setting.

    continued part 3

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  3. The election of Donald Trump halfway into his term forced Abe to sharply shift tactics while attempting to preserve the basic goals of his strategy. He quickly tried to ingratiate himself with Trump (famously flying to New York just weeks after the November 2016 election bearing a gift of a golden golf driver) in an effort to deflect the bilateral trade pressure that Abe knew was coming. While not entirely successful in these efforts, and paying a heavy price for what domestic critics saw as slavish behavior, Abe managed to avoid the worst of Trump’s tariffs on allies—most significant, threatened duties against the crown jewels of Japanese industry, automobiles.

    Trump’s decision to withdraw from TPP on his third day in office was a major inflection point for Abe. Where other Japanese prime ministers would likely have resigned themselves to collapse of the regional trade initiative without its principal sponsor at the table, Abe made one of his boldest moves: he took up the chairman’s gavel and persuaded the other 10 TPP members to carry on with the negotiations. Historians are likely to point to Abe’s stewardship of those talks to a successful conclusion—salvaging most of TPP in an eventual Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)—as one of the singular achievements of his term.

    Again, part of Abe’s strategic calculation about CPTPP was that it would plant a stake in the ground in the intensifying competition between Japan and China for regional leadership. As I have written elsewhere, while geographic proximity and commercial interdependence necessitate that Tokyo engage constructively with its large neighbor to the west, no Japanese leader can accept a Sinocentric order in the Asia-Pacific based on Beijing’s preferred rules and norms. Abe thus focused much of his economic statecraft on trying to offer alternatives to partners in the region.
    continued part 4

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  4. In addition to CPTPP, other noteworthy efforts in this regard included his campaign to promote “quality infrastructure.” Launched in 2015 as a thinly veiled response to China’s ambitious Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), Abe’s Partnership for Quality Infrastructure initially offered regional partners $110 billion (a number suspiciously close to the initial $100 billion capitalization of Beijing’s Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank) of Japanese investment in railways and ports with high standards of transparency and social, environmental, and fiscal sustainability. Abe then used his 2019 chairmanship of the Group of 20 (G20) to get his fellow economic leaders—including President Xi Jinping of China—to endorse a set of six “Principles for Quality Infrastructure Investment.”

    Data governance was another area in which Abe tried to make a statement about Japan’s preferred rules and norms. Often described as the “new oil,” data flow throughout the modern economy, yet there are few internationally agreed rules to govern the collection, storage, transfer, or privacy of data. Europe and China are staking out their own preferences in this area, but neither approach rests comfortably with Japan. Again, Abe used his role as host of the G20 in 2019 to win agreement to his concept of “data free flow with trust,” with the aim of starting a global conversation on this topic—along Japan’s preferred lines.

    Toward the end of his term, Abe worked more quietly to sharpen Japan’s domestic tools of "economic security." He won passage of legislation to tighten the country’s foreign investment screening mechanism, authorized stronger enforcement of export controls, and set up a new economics office in his National Security Secretariat. Most recently, Abe’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party has been considering proposals to strengthen intelligence agencies’ tools against commercial espionage.

    Balance—between offensive and defensive tools, between soliciting Washington’s favor and protecting Japan’s commercial interests, between engaging with and hedging against China—has been the hallmark of Shinzo Abe’s economic statecraft. His successor would do well to carry on this important dimension of the outgoing prime minister’s legacy.

    Matthew P. Goodman is senior vice president for economics and holds the Simon Chair in Political Economy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, D.C.

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