8 july 2022 shocked to hear of killing of former president abe - do you have a favorite speech or pdf of his? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - i would particularly like to understand his and Japan's support of Un2.0, humanising AI and ideas for 2020s shared at Japan G20- it will take some time to find references most worthy of celebration/ communal action - lets start with his celebration at United Nations 2019 ..........https://www.mofa.go.jp/fp/unp_a/page3e_001107.html....................Address by Prime Minister Abe at the Seventy-Fourth Session of the United Nations General Assembly September 24, 2019 Japanese e-mail Photo: Cabinet Public Relations Office 1. Mr. Chairman, under your chairmanship, the United Nations will commemorate the 75th anniversary of its founding. On this occasion, I ask you to recall that my country, Japan, upholding the principles of the United Nations, has walked a path that has been steadfast, always intending to realize the goals of the United Nations. For the UN, which has now come three quarters of a century since its founding, structural reform, especially that of the Security Council, is absolutely imperative. We aim for the early realization of such reform. In addition, Japan is standing in the 2022 election. By once again receiving the support of numerous countries, we wish to serve as a non-permanent member of the Security Council and make our best efforts towards the further realization of the principles of the UN. I ask for your ardent support in this. In Japan, a new Emperor has acceded to the imperial throne and the ceremony for His Majesty to declare this fact to both domestic and international audiences is near at hand, on October 22. Heads of state and government and top leaders from approximately 200 nations and international organizations will attend, and there is no greater joy than that of the well-wishing extended to us upon the start of the Emperor’s new era. The Japanese people regard this as an unparalleled opportunity and they will once again turn their thoughts to the role Japan takes on towards the world. In my country, the period in which a long-standing economic slump caused people to become inward-looking is now a thing of the past. Dates that raise awareness of our strong bonds with the world and turn people’s eyes outward and towards the future -- the Rugby World Cup, of which fierce contests continue to be played out at this very moment; the Olympic and Paralympic Games that will be held next year in Tokyo; and World Expo 2025 that Osaka and the surrounding region will host -- are written large on Japan’s calendar as landmark events. Created this way is a new generation of Japanese, one that is reliable, and willing to carry forth the UN ideals, you may want to say. I would like you also to keep in mind the meeting that will come around to Japan next April. The 14th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, commonly known as “the UN Crime Congress” will convene in Kyoto. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime holds the meeting once every five years. Fifty years will have passed since 1970, when Japan hosted this same meeting as the first UN Crime Congress held outside Europe. At its prime for cherry blossoms, Kyoto, I know, will be welcoming visiting experts in law enforcement. 2. What I have just said leads one to see what value Japan seeks in its engagement with the world, in that it values education, for the country's primary objective is to foster the power of individuals, one by one. To continue to do so has been and still is the very essence of what Japan can contribute to the rest of the world. As for the law enforcement experts who will gather in Kyoto next spring, Japan has done nothing one off, like bringing them to a meeting just once. Rather, it has long sought its own role in continuing to foster them. As early as in 1962, with the deepening of knowledge about crime prevention its primary objective, Japan established in Tokyo the United Nations’ first specialized institute in that field. Named the United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, this institute was launched with the late Norval Morris, a renowned criminologist, as its inaugural director. By the end of September this year it will have produced a large number of “alumni.” The total amounts to more than 5900, including, for instance, 2949 from Asia and 678 from Africa. 3. Now, it was this past March that Malala Yousafzai was in Tokyo. She looked me right in the eye and said, “As many as 100 million girls lack the skills they need to have a good command of modern technology, for they don't undergo a minimum education of 12 years.” She says that if all girls completed secondary school, they could add up to 30 trillion US dollars to the global economy. I invited Malala to Japan before the G20 Osaka Summit I would chair in June, hoping to highlight policies that empower women and girls. If women were able to demonstrate the potential they hold, the world would sparkle that much more. But that is an obvious truth, isn't it? In Japan, where the labour participation rate for women has seen a marked rise, we are witnessing that self-evident fact on a daily basis. I am delighted that we were able to capture what Malala advocates for in both the G20 Leaders’ Declaration and another outcome document in the annex. We pledged to “promote inclusive quality education for all girls and women.” Japan wishes to run at all times at the very front of the pack with respect to these efforts. 4. Now, let me tell you of an example from Tanzania. When I was turning 30 years of age, I remember a Tanzanian marathon runner, Juma Ikangaa, was fiercely competitive every time he ran the Tokyo Marathon. After returning home in Tanzania, Mr. Ikangaa, who considers Japan to be his second home, became a goodwill public relations ambassador at the local office of JICA, the Government of Japan’s agency for international cooperation. Sent from Japan to be stationed there, was a woman full of energy, named Miwa Ito. The two of them combined forces, with Ms. Ito getting sponsorship funding from 13 Japanese companies and Mr. Ikangaa searching for girls who could be future Olympians. Their efforts ultimately culminated in Tanzania’s first-ever women’s track meet. That was in November 2017. One thousand girls living nearby attending elementary and junior high schools were invited as spectators. But they were not there simply to watch the event. Educational materials on avoiding teenage pregnancy were also handed out. Having the girls read these materials was another purpose. In Arusha, Tanzania, an area the Masai and others call home, where the high peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro can be seen in the east-northeast, an all-girls’ junior high school named “Sakura” opened in January 2016 through the efforts of a group of Japanese people. The school is entirely residential in order to provide its students with absolute security and safety. The number of students has grown from 24 at the beginning to 162 this past spring. The Japanese government supports the school financially, but it is run by NGOs, both Japanese and local. They teach the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and mathematics -- and how to avoid unwanted pregnancies. In Cambodia as well, I know there is a Japanese entrepreneur who has been working to improve education there, a project that is entirely his own brainchild. His initiative sends Japanese teachers, seasoned veterans in math and science, to Cambodia. There, they coach young men and women who are on track to become teachers. The initiative is called “Teachers Without Borders.” I find it very much heart-warming to see people in Japan’s private sector devoting themselves voluntarily in this way to the education of young people, especially girls, in Tanzania and in Cambodia, purely out of intrinsic motivation, without seeking anyone’s recognition as such. 5. Over the next three years, the Government of Japan will provide enriched education to a minimum of nine million children and young people in Sub-Saharan African and Asian nations. We plan to expand “e-learning” for primary school children in Sri Lanka as well as Internet-based mathematics and science education in Rwanda. But I must say that these endeavours were largely inspired by the efforts underway by people in the private sector. Mr. Chairman, this is my seventh consecutive year to deliver a statement in the general debate at the General Assembly. Over this time, I have consistently emphasized the importance of empowering women and girls and the value of making health care universally available. This year too, I have addressed both of these issues at separate meetings on the side-lines. At the same time, I wish to emphasize that the essence of Japan’s international engagement can be found in the fact that we earnestly value education, as seen in the contributions of Japan that I just mentioned. Japan aspires to be an “FP,” shall I say, or a “foster power," one that fosters human capacity. 6. As I reach the end of my statement, I will raise three points briefly. Point number one is regarding North Korea. Japan supports the approach taken by President Trump. The approach by which the two leaders talk candidly with each other and try to work out the issues at hand while seeing a bright future ahead has changed the dynamics surrounding North Korea. I am determined to meet Chairman Kim Jong-un myself face to face, without attaching any conditions. Japan’s unchanging objective is to normalize its relations with North Korea through comprehensively resolving the outstanding issues of concern with North Korea, including the abductions, nuclear, and missile issues, as well as settling the unfortunate past. Point number two is that Japan shares the concerns regarding the Middle East situation. The attack on Saudi Arabia’s crude oil facilities was an extremely contemptible crime that holds the international economic order hostage. I consider precious the pronouncement made to me directly by Supreme Leader Khamenei of Iran, that he issued as a fatwa three repudiations regarding nuclear weapons, namely “not to possess, produce, or use” them, and has ensured thorough implementation of that fatwa. This morning too I held a summit meeting with President Rouhani, our ninth in total. It is my own unchanging role to call on Iran as a major power to take actions that are grounded in the wisdom derived from its rich history. Point number three, and my final point, is that Japan will make use of multilateral frameworks and globalism, to reduce disparities, inter alia. On the heels of the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement) and the Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement, the RCEP (Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership) is now poised to reach agreement, with Japan's contribution serving as a propelling force. The world will become more connected, leading more people to escape from poverty. In recent years I chaired the G7 and G20 summits as well as the Tokyo International Conference on African Development, or “TICAD,” three times, demonstrating repeatedly that multilateral frameworks do indeed have that role as a leveller. As a consequence, the terms “quality infrastructure” and “a free and open Indo-Pacific” have entered the lexicon of the international community, I would like you to note. 7. TICAD Seven held earlier this year was reborn as “New TICAD.” This is because the words to talk about Africa from now should by all means tell a story of investment and growth. In fact, the Business Forum held at the same time as the TICAD conference was jam-packed with businessmen and women from Africa and Japan and electric with eager enthusiasm. I also came out of the forum with a sense that new investment proposals and new projects are materializing quickly. Changes in Africa encourage us. The world does indeed change. We are able to change it through the efforts we make. And that confidence shall be reaffirmed right here in this great assembly hall. With that, I will end my statement. Thank you very much. Related Links Prime Minister Abe Visits the United States of America and Belgium (September 23-28, 2019) United Nations General Assembly Japan and the United Nations
welcome to economistjapan.com, Japanthanks.com and economistwomen.com - first 60 years
See all 276 articlesEaster Day 2021 - in the last 2 weeks Japan kickstarted the most exciting solutions debate on celebrating our human race's sustainability since the start of the 21st century or JFK's search in 1962
-thank you chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington dc and glasgow

No alt text provided for this image
urgent help needed for friends of japan and all young lives matter survey: how can japan society most help japan and japan's inspiration of asian sdg youth = two thirds of world youth? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

for worldwide views on 2020s as most exciting decade -defining our species future - please go to The Economist's Norman Macrae (Japan Order Rising Sun Gold Bars) Curriculum www.entrepreneurialrevolution.city
zoomuni.net -breaking 2020 -zooming beyond reality- some nations 30 years behind our 1984 timelines for ai teaching/ studying - download and ask for our maps of who's leading
chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk may 2020 (bicycling distance from national institute of health bethesda md usa) writes:
since 1960 most of the world's population mapping sdg development - eg asians as over 60% of humans have traded round a japanese translation of global system- compounding solutions americans like deming and borlaug open sourced -more than any other single system dynamic friends have been able to map- brookings update 2020- 5/15 how taipei, seoul, hk, saved their peoples, and hanoi

back to middle of 20th c-perhaps it shouldn't be that much of a surprise that it took one of the 2 island nations that most colonised borders up to world war 2 to culturally rollback a higher purpose for uniting peoples
.....

Untitled

chris macrae at welcome to SDGIRLS.net and economistsports.net - 2 months ago
*2020s 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G 1970s* *help! with top 20 Economist challenges* *these are the most exciting times to be alive* *E2 Jack Ma and E3 Sir Fazle Abed* *The most exciting game children have never played? World Record Book of Job Creation* *2025 report - last 7 years to global sustainability* *1960s world record jobs creators*......
Back to www.normanmacrae.comSDG education revolutionCommentaryFriends and FamilyFuture HistoryBiographycoming - books.. diary 2020
.
EntrepreneurialRevolution.city July 2020..If you care about two out of 3 lives mattering who are Asian, nearly 60 years of miracles mapping around worldwide decision-makers considering Japan from 1962 are worth replaying -that's when my father Norman Macrae aged 39 was privileged to write his first signed survey in The Economist -the first 2 quarters of dad's 80+ years of life had been spent
**writing unsigned leaders in The Economist (eg as only journalist at Messina's birth of EU) after serving as teenager in world war 2 navigating air places uk bomber command region modern day bangladesh/myanmar -
** following his father who worked for british diplomatic services around embassies in midst of conflict - eg mostow of stalin 1934, last adriatic port jews used to escape hitler 1938 )-during this quarter dad concluded that world wars root cause was the history of empires like britain and japan which had trapped most peoples in poverty, to end war he wanted to mediated loving each other's places, ;peoples and especially children

EconomistSports.net EconomistArts.com Musicforsdgs.com

Before we get to the list of miracles look at what has happened to japan in the fisrt year(s) of its new reiwa emperor era- planned was 40 million tourists with olympics ganes as peace-loving centrepiece ; apart from the olympic most tourism celebrated comunity hosts sme busienesses- all being decimated by the virus; japan is uniquely interesting as a nation as unlike other places run by a majority of elders its recruiting youth from other countries to deliver many of its frontline logistics services- this pan asean development plan has also been shattered; since japan loves sports for the right reason - community building not just big corporate noise - gthe ebst outcome would be the olympics beged asians to tale a majoity share of running futire olympics- this would be good for all four of the next hosts if the mayors of tokyo beijing milan and paris chatted about it- and it would be a great opportutity for womens lives matter to exorciose all the sexual predators - and ban ki-moon who is in the middle of 3 world chnaing movement cliate adatoability, curriculum of worldwide youth and teachers civic engagement , ethics dorectirate of teh olympocs could appoint a supersgtar panel of lives matter - eg the wike of kobe (mo0re at www.kobe.mba), manny pacquaio, and since tennis has always been the emeperor family's facoriote sport as well some uk royals, why not let japan and wimbledon select which tennis superstars can bridge retoremengt with linking in youth as the sddg generation.....

Norman Macrae, having survived teenage navigation of RAF planes bomber command world war 2 over modern-day myanmar/bangladesh, joined The Economist in 1949, and retired as the deputy editor of what he called "the world's favourite viewspaper" in 1988. During that time, he wrote extensively on the future of society and the impact of technology. Norman foresaw species sustainability as being determined by post-colonial and virtual mapmaking- 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G if 60s tech could race to moon and Moore alumni promised 100 times more machine intel every decade TO 2025, let's end poverty mediating/educating a world of loving each others' children- so that wherever the next millennials girl is born she enjoys great chance to thrive.

Soon Norman was celebrating his wartime enemy's rising engineers and win-win sme supply chains across far east and very concerned that tod down constitutions english speaking nations led by political bureaucrats wasn't fit for entrepreneurial revolution-he co-opted a young romani prodi to translate Economist 1976 ER survey into multilingual formats

Amongst some of his more outlandish claims: that governments would not only reverse the nationalisation process and denationalise formerly private industries, but would also sell industries and services that had been state operated for so long that it seemed impossible that they could be run by private companies. A pioneer before the pioneers, Macrae imagined privatised and competing telecommunications and utility companies improving service levels and reducing prices.

When others saw arms build-ups as heralding World War III, Macrae predicted the fall of the Berlin Wall by the end of the 1980's.

The Norman Macrae Archive serves as an on-line library, hosting a growing collection of Macrae articles, newspaper columns and highlights from his books. We hope that you find the articles thought provoking and zoom, twitter or question us - norman's son chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk



best wishes

1972 ecconomist survey of 1972-2012- WILL AMERICANS AND EUR-CITIZENS EVER BE FREED ENTREPRENEURIALLY FROM PAPER CURRENCIES THE ONLY ZERO-SUM TRADE MONOPLY IN A WORLD WHERE ACTIONABLE KNOWHOW MULTIPLIES VALUE UNLIKECONSUMING UP THING.....

youth hall of fame - japan global friendship associations 1 2 smart intrapreneurs- sony creative lounge


future of HIStory 1945 -to update 2020s version see also Princeton history project connections with osun and von neumanns future of humansai.com

look first at the G8 biggest jigsaw pieces of nearly 200 nations who sought to unite san francisco 1945-until the virus came 2020 was due to be the happy 75th birthday of nations 17sdgs as well as the frontline heroics of medecins sans frontieres and partners in health- coalitions of soft power had never been so urgent to valuetrue. Nature does not play with walls, and other games of externalization at borders -only mistaken male professionals do as they systemically confuse the power of big getting bigger with advancing the human lot for all our children including wherever the next girl is born

In 1945, there were just over 5% of people who lived in usa and Canada- they had twice saved the old world tri-continent of asia Africa and Europe from world wars. Most remarkably usa that in 1939 ranked 17th in terms of international navies on a par with Portugal had become the heart of the wining allied forces. You had the two northern islands at either end of the coastal belts of west Europe and far eat asia who had multiplied so many colonial poverty traps across the Asian 60+% majority of human race , Africa and middle east’s 10%. In trying to compete with uk, France had arguably been most brutal in colonizing med sea Africa, slave trading needed to develop America north wars up from louisana, as well as napoleons war of nations which had sucked in austria hungary , Germany and Russia among others.by start of 20th c Germany without colonies to feed its engineers need for carbon and steel had become bellicose across all its borders. This left less than 2% people in the iced up and largest land mass of all ussr ready to be the victims of stalin as the second most fearsome tyrant the first hal of 20th century grew exponentially. All the while half of humanity – women – were left out of how the word capitalized land and counted productivity even though a deeper look would show that the led with educators like Montessori and health networkers like Florence nightingale, marie curie and indeed the Franciscan role of the clares as community health missionaries- the conscience of mother mary if you will. 9se girlsworldbank.com) There were of course further geographic oddities- only 10% of people lived in the southern hemisphere; less than 1% of peoples lived on what became a quarter of all nations the SIDS- small island developing nations with minimal land resources but huge ocean estates very much dependent on climate, and nature including good human nature of tourism. And you had the archipelagos especially Indonesia and Philippines with large populations- one the epicentre of the world trade in medicinal spices – know how the dutch prized nutmeg so much that they were prepared to swap with the uk control of one indonesian holland with their us territory new Amsterdam rebranded new york

in 60 years


Thursday, October 31, 2019

coming from generations of diaspora scottish missionaries always been more comfy in japanese temples than gothic cathedrals but the burning of both japans and frances jewels in the sun is scary and sad- commiserations to all

also commiserations to peoples in chile, hong kong, lebanon and all 7 worlds and 5 oceans where we have so far failed to humanise ai and all the tech that look so primising in the moon race decade of the 1950s

tour asian communities rising with nhk and other human capital mediators

..
>laos
 kids house
midwives
young filmakers
vietnamese chase dreams
chinese drawn to laos
banana boom 
 cambodia weaving
fashion cambodian style
town where textiles and women thrive 
white gold : rice
poachers turned eco-guides
commune farmers on the up
return rural prosperity
happiness nutrition
mother of disabled children
golden age cambodian cinema
bettwr society by animation
life-changing circus
organic farming 
migrant workers 
vietnam forests
new distribution hub
drawing my homeland
vietnamese manga to mainstream
reviving water puppets
the man behind vietnam's beauties 
 myanmar
 affordable farming tools
punk rock changing society
sowing seeds of benovolence
dolphins help the fishermen 
fighting for peace 
 Thailand Halal Drive hong kong running out of space Mongolia cashmere to the world
mongolian hip hop 
 sri lanka gateway success for youth E Timor Female Entrepeneurs russia accessibility disabled vladivostok
 bangladesh
brick workers 
 philippines pushcar schools
retail revolution
learning english
career in care giving
educational reform
saving white beach
the peoples mayor 
 nepal $1 /month edu
city running dry kathmandu 
 bhutan shoes for everyone

uzbekistan- fashion returns to silk road 
papua women mean business indonesia garbage clinic
school of compassion
IT innovations
young tackling plastic trash in bali
cleaning up the tofu industry
indonesia's rainbow village
a library on horseback 
 korea youth Dachango
kids and cosmetics
preserving hanji tradition
new page for books
n korea defectors become s korea company presidents 
taipei public transport
taiwan ends nuclear
guardians of taiwans migrant mothers 
 singapore innovative farming
aging society
newater
from cradle to columbarium
medical tourism & beyond 

china yiwu wholesale www
christmas yiwu 
call centers of hope tiajin
rural tech & youth  
e-shopping village 
self-sufficient communities
revtializing farming hainan 
beijing underground artists 
beijings 706 youth space 
beijings gourmet town 
china's asd child stars 
world largest kung fu school 
night school students 
chinese youth internet fame 
migrant workers blue collar 
chengdu youth culture 
next china young perspectives
Ninxia Goja berry silk road sustains china's poorest 
partnership between japan and cambodia high schools
building cambodia's art scene 
cambodia to return plastic waste to usa
japanese gives back by removing mines in cambodin since 2006
cambodia crafts a village of poverty
herbal remedy start up in cambodia
 A missing link along one of Southeast Asia's most important transport corridors has been connected. The Tsubasa Bridgespanning the mighty Mekong River is now open. It's something Cambodians have dreamed about for centuries. The benefits are expected to be felt across the region, and beyond.
Several thousand people gathered to celebrate the bridge's opening in Neak Loeung, 60 kilometers southeast of the capital, Phnom Penh. Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen was also on hand to mark the historic occasion. "I'm sure this bridge will help strengthen the entire economy of the Asian region," Hun Sen said.
More than 100 million dollars in grant money from Japan went into building the Tsubasa Bridge. Its name comes from the Japanese word for wing. Planning for the bridge began 2004, and construction got underway in 2011.
"I've waited so long for this new bridge," a woman at the ceremony commented.
"It's like a dream," said one man. "I don't think we could ever have such a great bridge without Japan's help."
The bridge is opening ahead of the launch in December of the ASEAN Economic Community, or AEC. The 10 members of the Southeast Nation bloc are trying to create a single regional market.
The AEC will promote the free flow of people, goods and services within ASEAN. That's a mega market of 600 million people. Its economy could rival other regional powers, such as China and India.
The key to integration is infrastructure. This is especially true for the transportation routes connecting the main cities.
One of those routes is the Southern Economic Corridor. It runs from Vietnam's commercial hub, Ho Chi Minh City, via Phnom Penh in Cambodia to the Thai capital, Bangkok, and beyond. It's already become one of the region's most important commercial arteries. The Tsubasa Bridge makes it even more essential.

Patchari Raksawong spoke to Sho Beppu and Aki Shibuya from near the bridge.Raksawong: People living in this region have been waiting for this bridge for many years. They're thankful the mighty Mekong River made their land fertile. But the waterway also acted as a natural wall, dividing the Indochina Peninsula into East and West.
Before the 2,200-meter span was built, the only way to cross was by ferry. Though the crossing takes only 5 minutes, the waiting time to board a ferry turns the trip into a long one. Workers constructing the new bridge faced numerous challenges unique to this region. During the rainy season, the water rises about 7 meters. So the bridge piers had to be installed during the 6-month-long dry season. In addition, about 5,000 unexploded shells from the time of Cambodia's civil war were discovered near the construction site.
The bridge is featured on the most recent banknote issued by the government. This shows the significance of this bridge not only for the Cambodian economy but for the region as a whole.Shibuya: It seems a lot of people have a lot of hope invested in this bridge.Raksawong: That's right. The Tsubasa Bridge became a symbol of development and change even before it opened. And then there's the ASEAN Economic Community, which is expected to transform the playing field here. Many businesses are already betting on the benefits of what's to come.Masashi Yamaguchi reported from a restaurant in Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh, where fresh seafood and vegetables are popular.

As Cambodians become wealthier, demand for high-priced perishable foods is rising.
A Japanese-run logistics company with a base in Vietnam is aiming to boost exports of perishable foods to Cambodia before the bridge opens. It wants to make lettuce its first export to Cambodia. The reduced use of chemicals gives it a hint of sweetness, and it is double the price of normal lettuce. But officials are confident that Cambodians, especially the well-to-do, will be happy to pay.
Last year, the firm obtained a license to make it easier to transport perishable foods to Cambodia. This is because it will enable them to cross the border without transferring their cargo to a different vehicle.
An official from the logistics firm visited a Japanese vegetable wholesaler that supplies high-end restaurants in Cambodia. They decided to do a trial delivery of lettuce to Cambodia.
An agricultural conglomerate in Cambodia, the Mong Reththy Group, also wants to use the bridge to expand exports. It's focusing on the port in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Usage fees there are 25 percent lower than Cambodian ports. They want to use it for exports to Asia and Europe. They've expanded mango production. They've chosen a type popular in Japan and planted 120,000 trees. They hope to start exports to Japan within two years.
The economic corridor will revolutionize the regional distribution system. Cross-border flows of goods are likely to create a lot of business opportunities.

Beppu: This bridge really marks of the dawn of a new era for Cambodia and its neighbors. How is ASEAN expected to change in the coming years?
Raksawong: Efforts are underway to strengthen connectivity in Indochina. The peninsula is home to half of ASEAN's 10 members. Crews are building two east-west corridors in Indochina, along with a north-south corridor. The 3 corridors form a network centering on Thailand, a hub of ASEAN's manufacturing industry. Railways are also being constructed east-west and north-south on the peninsula. Japan and China vied to win contracts for these infrastructure projects. They're keen to participate in such undertakings in ASEAN, an engine of the global economy. Both of these Asian economic powers want to capitalize on the bloc's growth.
Shibuya: What kind of challenges are Cambodia and other ASEAN members facing?
Raksawong: Cambodian and Vietnamese leaders are trying to narrow the development gap between their countries and Thailand. From Thailand's perspective, cheap labor is available just next door. The nation attracts millions of both legal and illegal workers from neighboring countries. Efforts to bolster connectivity should not end up concentrating people and social capital only in Thailand. ASEAN needs a strategy to boost its economy as a whole. Thailand's neighbors need to promote their geographical advantages and do a better job luring foreign investment. To do that, they have to improve infrastructure and produce highly skilled experts.




  • March 2019

    February 2019

    January 2019

    December 2018

    November 2018

    New Guardian of Cyberspace<br>Marina Kaljurand

    October 2018

    September 2018

    August 2018

    Life Is Awesome!<br>Beatrice Vio
    Future Food Now<br>Elena Shifrina

    July 2018

    Playing by the Rules<br>Margrethe Vestager
    A Future without Parkinson's<br>Tilo Kunath
    Open Data Save Lives<br>Mahar Lagmay
    Protecting Our Oceans<br>Manuel Barange

    June 2018

    Adding Bubbles, Adding Fun<br>Hidefumi Kimura
    The Power of Theater<br>Satoshi Miyagi
    Living in the AI Era<br>Noriko Arai
    The Beauty of Furniture<br>Masahiro Kato
    Theater for Social Change<br>Maria Isabel Legarda
    Improving the Health of the World<br>Jeremy Farrar
    Problems into Products<br>Kentaro Ohyama
    Defending Human Rights<br>Alejandra Ancheita
    Keep Reaching for Truth<br>Kyaw Zwa Moe
    A World of Flavor<br>Takaaki Nishii
    Even Withered Flowers Can Bloom<br>Senko Ikenobo
    The Children’s Champion<br>Helle Thorning-Schmidt

    May 2018

    Knitting the Future by Hand<br>Tamako Mitarai
    Preventing Pandemics<br>Peter Piot
    The Spirit of Silk Weaving<br>Kommaly Chanthavong
    Saving Children Affected by AIDS<br>Chung To
    Champion for Refugees<br>Alf Dubs
    Vaccinating the World<br>Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala
    Mahathir bin Mohamad PART 1
    Mahathir bin Mohamad PART 2
    World-first Industrial Robots<br>Hiroshi Ogasawara
    Captivated by the Sound of Joy<br>Anyango
    Learning from Japanese Subculture<br>Ian Condry
    Showcasing Local Charms<br>Yoshiharu Hoshino
    The Mission of Zoos<br>Gen Bando
    Our Grandmother Earth<br>Maritza Morales Casanova
    Champion of Education<br>Julia Gillard

    April 2018

    The Digital-Age Wizard<br>Yoichi Ochiai
    Cutting No Corners<br>Tomoyuki Kobayashi
    Samsung, Chaebol and Economy Reformation in South Korea<br>Chang Sea-jin
    Protecting Our Biodiversity<br>Kathy Willis
    Step Out onto Planet Earth<br>Tony Wu
    Appliances That Make Life Fun<br>Gen Terao
    Protecting Humanity from AI<br>Nick Bostrom
    Championing Women as Leaders in Football<br>Patricia Rodriguez
    Becoming a Luxury Brand<br>Shinji Hattori
    New Guardian of Cyberspace<br>Marina Kaljurand
    Reject Intolerance, Embrace Diversity<br>Rahimah Abdulrahim
    Aquarium Innovation<br>Tetsuhiro Shikiyama
    Yarn Unlike Any Other<br>Masaki Sato
    Hopes for South Korea, the Suicide Nation<br>Ha Sang-hun
    Learn by Doing<br>Xavier López Ancona
    Bridges Between Cultures<br>Hartwig Fischer

    March 2018

    Unity for the Future Europe<br>Enrico Letta
    Different is Beautiful<br>Onn Sokny
    Comfort from Discomfort<br>Takahisa Takahara
    Leaders Forged Through Hardship<br>Minami Tsubouchi
    Pioneering Planetary Exploration<br>Carolyn Porco
    100% Renewable Energy for the World<br>Mark Z. Jacobson
    Leading a Sogo Shosha<br>Tatsuo Yasunaga
    Enhancing Social Compassion<br>Edmund Yeo
    The Future of Putin's Russia<br>Hélène Carrère d'Encausse
    Making the Future<br>Dale Dougherty
    The Power of the Actor<br>Ivana Chubbuck
    Safe Water for the World<br>Kanetoshi Oda
    Bringing Chinese Martial Arts to the World<br>Wu Bin
    Providing a Platform for Asian Designers<br>Charina Widjaja

    February 2018

    At the Frontier of Embryology<br>Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz
    Step Out onto Planet Earth<br>Tony Wu
    Education in Japanese-Canadian Internment Camp<br>Chieko Mizoue
    Developing Massive Hit Video Games<br>Haruhiro Tsujimoto
    International Man of Space<br>Jan Woerner
    Conservation Works!<br>David Field
    The Potential of Washi<br>Eriko Horiki
    The Human Essence Through Dance<br>Saburo Teshigawara
    The Spirit of Silk Weaving<br>Kommaly Chanthavong
    The Challenge of Artificial Intelligence<br>Jon Crowcroft
    Arita Porcelain Goes Global<br>Masaru Kamachi
    Facing the Aging Society<br>Wu Yushao
    Antarctica – Key to the Planet<br>David Vaughan
    Literature Binds Our Divided World<br>Kazuo Ishiguro
    Shaking Up the Spirits Industry<br>Takeshi Niinami
    Defying Limits<br>Yuichiro Miura
    Let’s Build a Robot!<br>Zhou Jian

    January 2018

    Doctor on a Mission<br>Tadashi Hattori
    Making the World Better Place<br>Izumi Nakamitsu
    Survival Strategy for a Global Enterprise<br>Tony Lo
    Opening Up the World of Ukiyo-e<br>Julie Nelson Davis
    No One is Above the Law<br>Conchita Carpio Morales
    Religious Tolerance and Speaking out Against Terror<br>Harun Khan
    Puppets Can Connect Us<br>Maria Tri Sulistyani
    Shipping Firm Tackles Stormy Seas<br>Junichiro Ikeda
    You're Never Too Old for a New Challenge!<br>Osamu Suzuki
    Appreciating Neurodiversity<br>Eiko Ikegami
    Living Long in Hong Kong<br>Lam Tai-Hing
    Life Is a Jazz Session<br>Makoto Ozone
    Ephemeral Beauty at Our Feet<br>Yasuhiko Fujikawa
    The Age of Words<br>Lech Walesa
    A New Kind of Solidarity<br>Lech Walesa
    Improving Access to Finance<br>Trung Dung

    December 2017

    Helping Children<br>Lin Chiling
    Making Good Living a Reality<br>Satoru Matsuzaki
    International Man of Space<br>Jan Woerner
    Preventing Pandemics<br>Peter Piot
    Sweet Creations<br>Dominique Ansel
    A New Ink Wash Tradition<br>Hidekichi Shigemoto
    Support Refugee Scientists<br>Eqbal Dauqan
    Religious Tolerance and Speaking out Against Terror<br>Harun Khan
    Education Makes Us Human<br>Andrea Hirata
    Architecture That Embraces Its Environment<br>Tadao Kamei
    Improving the Health of the World<br>Jeremy Farrar
    China's Global Ambitions<br>Eswar Prasad
    Literature Binds Our Divided World<br>Kazuo Ishiguro
    Creating New Attractions with Light<br>Motoko Ishii
    Sake as an Island Ambassador<br>Rumiko Obata
    Bridging the Gap<br>Akihiko Reizei
    Learning from Japanese Subculture<br>Ian Condry

    November 2017

    The Age of Words<br>Lech Walesa
    A New Kind of Solidarity<br>Lech Walesa
    Puppets Can Connect Us<br>Maria Tri Sulistyani
    The Shape of Music<br>Yoshihide Otomo
    Restoring Masterpieces<br>Kikuko Iwai
    Step into The Sky<br>Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao
    Designs for Life and Nature<br>Wang Shu
    Manufacturing Through Synergy<br>Yoshinori Kanehana
    Reject Intolerance, Embrace Diversity<br>Rahimah Abdulrahim
    Protecting Our Biodiversity<br>Kathy Willis
    Music Will Transform You<br>Sarita Mishra
    Growth Through Dance<br>Yuko Igarashi
    Making the World Better Place<br>Izumi Nakamitsu
    The Children’s Champion<br>Helle Thorning-Schmidt
    Education Makes Us Human<br>Andrea Hirata
    The Future of Motorcycles<br>Hiroyuki Yanagi
    Supporting Wildlife<br>Chen Liangzhong
    Champion of Education<br>Julia Gillard

    October 2017

    Becoming a Luxury Brand<br>Shinji Hattori
    Keep Reaching for Truth<br>Kyaw Zwa Moe
    Sweet Creations<br>Dominique Ansel
    Creating Everyday Comforts<br>Itsuo Hama
    Go Beyond GDP<br>Dasho Kinley Dorji
    At the Frontier of Embryology<br>Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz
    Music Will Transform You<br>Sarita Mishra
    Challenging Conventions<br>Hiroshi Sakurai
    Iron Works of Art<br>Yoshindo Yoshihara
    Face the Past, Learn from History<br>Youk Chhang
    Fighting to Live True to Yourself<br>Chi Chia-wei
    Picture Books for Children<br>Ikuko Ishikawa
    Supporting the World's Runners<br>Motoi Oyama
    Survival Strategy for a Global Enterprise<br>Tony Lo
    Exploring Color Aesthetics<br>Mika Ninagawa

    September 2017

    America's Dissident Voice<br>Oliver Stone
    Taking Wagashi Worldwide<br>Chikara Mizukami
    Defying Limits<br>Yuichiro Miura
    Keys to Longevity<br>Michel Poulain
    Fighting against Art Crime<br>Fabrizio Parrulli
    Helping Children<br>Lin Chiling
    Leading a Sogo Shosha<br>Tatsuo Yasunaga
    Drumming Up a New Sound<br>Eitetsu Hayashi
    Picture Books for Children<br>Ikuko Ishikawa
    Living Long in Hong Kong<br>Lam Tai-Hing
    Ballet for the Future<br>Kevin O’Hare
    Zippers for Everyday Clothes<br>Tadahiro Yoshida
    Breaking Hi-Tech’s Glass Ceiling with Art<br>Sputniko!
    Safe Water for the World<br>Kanetoshi Oda
    Talking about North Korea<br>Yang Xiyu
    The Fight to Regain Independent Journalism<br>Chris Yeung
    Questioning Democracy<br>Mohsen Makhmalbaf

    August 2017

    The Other Man Behind Ghibli<br>Toshio Suzuki
    Our Grandmother Earth<br>Maritza Morales Casanova
    Take No as a Question<br>Mechai Viravaidya
    Fashion is Art<br>Andrew Bolton
    Shaking Up the Spirits Industry<br>Takeshi Niinami
    Diversity in a Globalized World<br>Inga Beale
    Reviving a Theme Park<br>Hideo Sawada
    The Paralympic Vision<br>Philip Craven
    A Recipe for Happiness<br>Cai Yani
    Staying Sharp<br>Koji Endo
    A Fibers Revolution<br>Tatsuo Kawada
    Building Bridges<br>Ton Nu Thi Ninh
    The Future of Newspapers<br>Lionel Barber
    The Power of Music<br>Daniel Barenboim
    Designing the Formless<br>Tokujin Yoshioka
    Evolution in Knitting<br>Masahiro Shima
    Champion of the Rule of Law<br>Philippe Sands
    Healthcare for All<br>Cynthia Maung

    July 2017

    Opening Up the World of Ukiyo-e<br>Julie Nelson Davis
    Open Data Save Lives<br>Mahar Lagmay
    Open Minds Drive Innovations<br>Jackie Yi-Ru Ying
    Shipping Firm Tackles Stormy Seas<br>Junichiro Ikeda
    Life Is a Jazz Session<br>Makoto Ozone
    Bring the Facts to the People<br>Mark Thompson
    No One is Above the Law<br>Conchita Carpio Morales
    Gardens of Zen<br>Shunmyo Masuno
    Originality Is Everything<br>Hiroshi Sakata
    The Paralympic Vision<br>Philip Craven
    Defending Human Rights<br>Alejandra Ancheita
    Fashion is Art<br>Andrew Bolton
    A Global Soy Sauce<br>Noriaki Horikiri
    Learn by Doing<br>Xavier López Ancona
    The Future of Newspapers<br>Lionel Barber
    The Potential of Washi<br>Eriko Horiki

    June 2017

    Diversity in a Globalized World<br>Inga Beale
    The Art of Chinese Tea<br>Li Shuyun
    Doctor on a Mission<br>Tadashi Hattori
    Bring the Facts to the People<br>Mark Thompson
    Dream Audaciously<br>Cheong Koon Hean
    Laughter Knows No Borders<br>Sanyutei Ryuraku
    Champion of the Rule of Law<br>Philippe Sands
    Slow Food - Food Culture is an Act of Love<br>Carlo Petrini
    Reaping a New Harvest<br>Masatoshi Kimata
    Ensuring Every Child's Care and Education<br>Indira Ranamagar
    For a Cleaner China<br>Ma Jun
    Taking Ramen Global<br>Toshiyuki Kiyomiya
    Protecting China's Cultural Heritage<br>Wang Xudong
    Architecture for Green Cities<br>Vo Trong Nghia

    May 2017

    Creating Everyday Comforts<br>Itsuo Hama
    Going ”Global to Local”<br>Helena Norberg-Hodge
    North Korea - Danger and Hope<br>Victor Cha
    Farming with Film<br>Yuichi Mori
    Humanistic Capitalism<br>Brunello Cucinelli
    A Gardening Magician<br>Kazuyuki Ishihara
    Protecting the Digital World<br>Eva Chen
    Globalization for All<br>Joseph Stiglitz
    Fighting Global Poverty<br>Winnie Byanyima
    Restoring Masterpieces<br>Kikuko Iwai
    Challenging Conventions<br>Hiroshi Sakurai
    Face the Past, Learn from History<br>Youk Chhang
    Coaching to Victory<br>Eddie Jones
    Creating a Hit<br>Katsuhisa Ezaki
    Make Development People-Centered<br>Tri Mumpuni

    April 2017

    A Fibers Revolution<br>Tatsuo Kawada
    Designing the Formless<br>Tokujin Yoshioka
    A Climate Scientist Speaks Out<br>Saleemul Huq
    Globalization for All<br>Joseph Stiglitz
    Hear the Voice of the People<br>Dominique de Villepin
    Evolution in Knitting<br>Masahiro Shima
    Taking Wagashi Worldwide<br>Chikara Mizukami
    Fighting Global Poverty<br>Winnie Byanyima
    North Korea - Danger and Hope<br>Victor Cha
    Culture is Free<br>Pichet Klunchun
    Zippers for Everyday Clothes<br>Tadahiro Yoshida
    Slow Food - Food Culture is an Act of Love<br>Carlo Petrini
    Open Minds Drive Innovations<br>Jackie Yi-Ru Ying
    Safe Water for All<br>Chay Lo

    March 2017

    A World That Needs Rules<br>Christopher Patten
    The Power of Music<br>Daniel Barenboim
    Reviving a Theme Park<br>Hideo Sawada
    Staying Sharp<br>Koji Endo
    A Bleak Outlook for North Korea<br>Blaine Harden
    Calligraphy, Beyond the Page<br>Sisyu
    Fire Trucks Evolved<br>Masahiro Nakajima
    Fight the Culture of Corruption<br>Adnan Topan Husodo
    China's Budget Airline<br>Wang Zhenghua
    The Spirit of Taiko<br>Ikuo Fujitaka
    The Power of Manga<br>Yoichi Takahashi
    Promoting Ethical Business in Myanmar<br>Yin Myo Su
    Preventing Nuclear Proliferation<br>Mark Fitzpatrick
    A Climate Scientist Speaks Out<br>Saleemul Huq
    Technology That Makes People Shine<br>Mikiko
    Uniting People Through Music<br>Valery Gergiev
    Humanistic Capitalism<br>Brunello Cucinelli
    A Recipe for Happiness<br>Cai Yani
    America's Dissident Voice<br>Oliver Stone

    February 2017

    ..