youth hall of fame - japan global friendship associations 1 2 smart intrapeneurs- sony creative lounge

olympics ?how youth sustain nations

Chris Macrae
Status is online

Chris Macrae

osun open society un partners world sdg solutions eg 260 years adam smith alumni 50 of fazleabed.com what would you want

breaking 3/24 -japan olympics postponed for year thanks abe ..koike ..nbc ..jack ma ..and most of all every athlete -moore economistarts.com economistsports.net

breaking 3/24 american culture/values do not exist without sport. i am not saying this is a good thing- in 1999 i edited triple special issue of jnl of marketing management on brand reality- how millennials needed smart media and to mobilise big data platforms celebrating more action learning less ads -but now is the time to celebrate eg nbc tv distributor of the games message to japan and olympics committee- back their responsibility to choose when tokyo and global athlete star- moore Q&A welcome at co-blog MAolympics.com

.

Tuesday, December 31, 2030

remembering deming -rising sun 1950-2020

 wrj deming   rising sun of engineering japan from 1950s on








.KennethHopper

“In four years this democrat in dictator’s clothing (Homer Sarasohn) may have accomplished more than any economic dictator in history” “A lesson learned and a lesson forgotten”, Robert Wood, FORBES.
“Sarasohn teamed up with Protzman in 1948 to design and teach intensive management training seminars, the Civil Communication Section (CCS) Management Seminar .. After World War II, Japan’s ‘captains of industry’ fortified Sarasohn’s management values with Japanese Bushido values.. , they ... produced the postwar ‘miracle’? Yoshio Kondo, Baruch College, City of New York.
“A leader’s main obligation is to secure the faith and respect of those under him”, Charles Protzman and Homer Sarasohn, CCS Manual, GHQ Tokyo, 1950
“I gave over 500 lectures in every part of Japan from Hokkaido in the north to Kyushu in the south” “CCS was the light that illuminated everything” “By the end of the (1950) CCS seminar we all knew we would catch up with the Americans”
Bunzaemon Inoue, co-chair, CCS Seminars. Chairman, Sumitomo Rubber Industries
General MacArthur’s Civil Communications Section was very important for both Deming and Japan’s success. Our ignorance of it is surprising. CCS drilled into Japanese top executives that they were responsible for good management. When one missed a CCS session, CCS was on the phone to remonstrate. “Our slightest wish was their command”, Protzman remembered(1) Deming would be saddened at CCS neglect. I know. When illness struck, he sent me a substantial sum to help me tell the CCS story. When Human Resource Management published my “Creating Japan’s New Industrial Management” Deming wrote me “This is just what I need.”
Late in 1969 Peter Drucker phoned to say he had someone I should meet. I asked no questions and turned up to find a near mythical Japanese Sensei (teacher) Takeo Kato. Kato started to tell me about CCS when the tall Polkinghorn appeared and Kato said, “No man has done more for Japanese industry”. I was hooked. In 1979, my wife and I were treated like royalty in Japan at the invitation of Sumitomo Electric, Sumitomo Rubber and Matsushita Electric. Because we knew the great CCS engineers, dinners, waiting limousines, guides and interpreters were everywhere. The story of CCS is now well known in industry but has not reached business schools who prefer to see Japan’s success as an inexplicable Miracle. Simplistic Shock Treatment was given Russia when the lesson from Japan was rebuilding requires work in depth including improving how factories run. The most let down were non Asian developing nations.
Communications in Japan in 1945 were a disaster. The War Department approached US industry for help and able people responded including a young Homer Sarasohn who had impressed the US Army at MIT’s Rad Lab, Charles Protzman, a 6.ft 4in manufacturing superintendent with decades of experience from Western Electric and Frank Polkinghorn a high engineer in Bell Labs. I came to know all well. Their ability and domain knowledge made it possible for Japan’s unimpressive electrical manufacturers to become its world stunning Consumer Electronics Industry. Influenced by Morgenthau, the US had shackled MacArthur with Secret Order JCS1380/15 to take no responsibility for the Japanese economy. As a result, when Truman announced the Reverse Course in late 1948, CCS was the only Section engaged with manufacturing. CCS proposed that it combine seminars with working with its manufacturers to help them compete in world markets. Sarasohn loved to recount his 1949 confrontation before MacArthur with the large Economic and Scientific Section who argued the US would be giving away too much. MacArthur sat expressionless through both presentations, got up and walked to the door. Sarasohn thought, “I’ve blown it”. MacArthur turned, pointed the stem of his corncob pipe at him and said, “Go do it”. The rest is history. Japan’s electronics industry would have a major influence on management in the rest of Japanese industry and the world.
Japan’s specialists wanted a visit from Shewhart. Sarasohn refused until 1950. When he phoned, Shewhart declined for ill health. Sarasohn confirmed Deming’s ability. At his request, ESS issued the formal invitation. Many have confirmed CCS importance. My brother Will has a selection at http://www.puritangift.com including an abbreviated chapter on CCS and Japan’s extraordinary executives from our book The Puritan Gift, a Financial Times Top Ten Business Book of 2007 Ken Hopper
“A lesson learned and a lesson forgotten”, Robert Wood, FORBES, Feb 6, 1989. “Homer Sarasohn and American Involvement in the Evolution of Quality Management in Japan, 1945–1950”. N. I. Fisher, International Statistical Review (2008). K. Kobayashi, Chairman NEC Corporation, in his 1985 address to Bell Laboratories. "For more about the early development of quality control in postwar Japan, see 'Quality, Japan and the U.S.: the First Chapter'” Ken Hopper Quality Progress Sept 1985
----------------------------------------------

Finding miracles – Norman Macrae


The Economist’s anonymity policy makes it somewhat difficult for individual journalists to rise to fame. It’s thus not surprising that the death of Norman Macrae in 2010 did not create more widespread coverage given that he spent his entire career with the weekly paper. With Macrae, though, the world lost one of its most formidable journalists that had a very special connection to Japan.
alitalia_ad
Fancy flying to Tokyo on Alitalia? Ad in Economist 1962
I stumbled upon Macrae when researching the Japanese Economic Miracle. He had spent the summer of 1962 in Japan and wrote his famous “Consider Japan” dispatches that were to make the (business) world aware of the rising giant in the East.
While he set out to educate the then overwhelmingly British audience of the magazine of the virtues of Japanese post-war economic policy, the Japanese public quickly picked up the survey. A translation of it was soon published under the somewhat more triumphant title “Amazing Japan” (Odorokubeki Nihon).
Luckily for us, there’s a reprint available on Macrae’s son’s website as well as a lot of the original text can be read in the Economist’s archives (part onepart two, some of the adverts that ran with it are here and here).
The gist of the survey is perhaps best summed up in this book review (I would assume from 1964 or 1965) in academic journal Developing Economies, written by Japanese economist Hisao Kanamori. In Macrae’s eyes, Japan was developing so rapidly because
  1. The Japanese economy has not yet fully been developed.
  2. Japan has inherited advantages from prewar days.
  3. The influences of the American Occupation policies.
  4. Japanese people has [sic] a vigorous desire for advance.
  5. Excellent economic policies, and
  6. The influence of the peculiar social systems in Japan.

No comments:

Post a Comment